bats

Related Pages

  • Article: How do bats echolocate and how are they adapted to this activity?
    Bats are a fascinating group of animals. They are one of the few mammals that can use sound to navigate--a trick called echolocation. Of the some 900 species of bats, more than half rely on echolocation to detect obstacles in flight, find their way into roosts and forage for food. Find out in this article by Scientific American. https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-do-bats-echolocate-an/
  • Video Collection: AskNAture- Biological Strategies of bats
    This AskNature video collection focuses on the biological strategies and other qualities bats have developed such as wing flexibility, biosonar, saliva compounds, internal magnetic compass and more. Learn more bats and the innovations they inspire in this video resource. https://asknature.org/?s=bats&page=1&is_v=1
  • Video: Show Me Some Science! Polarization of the Sky
    Bees are capable of remarkable feats of orientation and navigation; they have a very strong sense of direction. Find out more in this easy experiment.
  • Article About Pollinators
    Birds, bats, bees, butterflies, beetles, and other small mammals that pollinate plants are responsible for bringing us one out of every three bites of food. They also sustain our ecosystems and produce our natural resources by helping plants reproduce.
  • Article: For horseshoe bats, wiggling ears and nose makes biosonar more informative
    Researchers at Virginia Tech are gaining insight into just how important wiggly noses and ears are to bats and their bio sonar systems. Find out more in this short article. https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-04/vt-fhb040417.php
  • Article: Meet “Chirocopter”: A drone that flies within swarms of bats
    Wildlife biologists have put drones to work counting whales, checking bird nests, and nabbing poachers. Now, they’ve designed a drone that can hover within fast-flowing swarms of bats as they zip across a darkened nighttime sky. The drone—or “Chirocopter” (named after Chiroptera, the scientific name for bats)—is equipped with a microphone to record echolocation chirps (sounds that bats use to navigate) and a thermal camera that can “see” bats by detecting their body heat. https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/03/meet-chirocopter-drone-flies-within-swarms-bats
  • Article: Monitoring Solitary Bees Using Open Technology
    “Bees in the Backyard” is a citizen science technology project to investigate the nesting behavior of Mason bees, by Mike Teachman, amateur bee enthusiast and Paul Perrault senior field applications engineer.
  • Article: Not Just the Birds and Bees – 6 Fast Facts About Pollinating Bats
    The birds and the bees may rule the daytime, but as soon as the sun sets, it is the bats that get to work pollinating.  Worldwide, over 500 species of flowers in at least 67 plant families rely on bats as their major or exclusive pollinators. Learn more in this National Wildlife Foundation article.
  • Bat Conservation International Species Profiles
    Check out species profiles of bats around the world in this online library by Bat Conservation International. Search by state to find out which bats you might find locally. http://www.batcon.org/resources/media-education/species-profiles
  • Bats Use Polarized Light To Set Internal Compasses
    Although bats are known for using echolocation to orient and navigate, they draw on a suite of senses to get around. A new study reveals another ability: Bats use patterns of polarized light in the sky to navigate.
  • Edible NM Magazine article: Creative Pollination
    Los Foodies is a community. Los Foodies is you, Los Foodies is us. Los Foodies is new Mexico cuisine. We are a group of Foodies who are constantly in search of the best that the new Mexico Food and Beverage industry has to offer.
  • Experiment: Designer Ears Make “better” ears!
    Why do animals’ ears look different from yours? What would life be like if your ears were shaped differently? Make new ears for yourself and find out. Try out this quick activity to prototype an idea.
  • Lesson: Polarization
    You may not be aware of it, but polarized light is all around you. Generally speaking, the human visual system is not particularly adept at perceiving polarized light. While some animals, bees in particular, are quite sensitive to polarized light, humans usually find it difficult to detect it with the unaided eye.  Find out more from this lesson on Polarization from Arbor Scientific.
  • Online Radio: Bat-lovers unite! Monitoring, protecting and loving our flying mammal friends
    The Taos Land Trust has been monitoring the bat population at Rio Fernando Park in Taos, New Mexico for over a year. How do we do it? Bat expert Mike Balistreri explains the scientific process of monitoring bats, the status of bat populations in northern New Mexico and dives into the importance of bats for our ecosystems. Find out more about the 20 species of bats found at Rio Fernando Park in the Taos Land Trust's radio show. https://soundcloud.com/taos-land-trust/bats?fbclid=IwAR2LNsKc_Kin9c1pSm296l4_1uikxfytsJid6cxdMesvo2qYtGt1uhJ-LEQ
  • Tutorial: Ultrasonic Sensor HC-SR04 and Arduino Tutorial
    In this Arduino Tutorial we will learn how the HC-SR04 Ultrasonic Sensor works and how to use it with the Arduino Board.
  • Video: Bat sounds reveal bat secrets
    The Carolinas Regional Acoustic Bat Survey aims to identify bats, where they are going, and how they are doing in urban and rural environments by recording their calls. https://www.pbs.org/video/bat-sounds-reveal-bat-secrets-mqvq9v/
  • Video: Bats advancing human technology
    Bats are known for their bony wings and fast flight. Researchers at Brown University in Rhode Island are studying these characteristics to determine how bats can advance human technology.
  • Video: Biobots- Snakebot, Batbot, and More Robots Inspired by Nature | WIRED
    Nature knows what it’s doing, and roboticists are more than happy to steal evolution’s ideas to make a plethora of curious and clever machines. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XDeR1JYXSy0
  • Video: Echolocation
    Are bats really blind? Not exactly. Besides their eyes, bats use a special process called echolocation to navigate their environment. Watch this video to find out how bats "see" the world around them as they look for prey in the dark.
  • Video: Hear My Nectar: Dish-Shaped Leaves Attract Pollinating Bats
    Scientist Ralph Simon explains how a dish-shaped leaf attracts bat pollinators.
  • Video: PHYSICS GIRL EXPERIMENT- Only some humans can see this type of light
    Join Physics girl on a tour of polarized light and learn how to do a simple project to see the invisible.
  • Video: The Bat Bridges of Austin, Texas
    An estimated 1.5 million Brazilian free-tailed bats spend their summers under the Congress Avenue Bridge in Austin, Texas. Learn more about urban bats and their habitat in this video by Urban Nature. https://www.pbs.org/video/the-bat-bridges-of-austin-texas-eaxyxv/
  • Video: What Is Echolocation? | Earth Unplugged
    Echolocation allows animals to build up an understanding of their surroundings but how does it work? Find out the science of echolocation in the BBC Unplugged video.
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