bees

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  • Video: Show Me Some Science! Polarization of the Sky
    Bees are capable of remarkable feats of orientation and navigation; they have a very strong sense of direction. Find out more in this easy experiment.
  • Article About Pollinators
    Birds, bats, bees, butterflies, beetles, and other small mammals that pollinate plants are responsible for bringing us one out of every three bites of food. They also sustain our ecosystems and produce our natural resources by helping plants reproduce.
  • Article: Bio-inspired Bug Eye Camera | Artificial Compound Eye
    In this study, University of Colorado researchers combined elastomeric compound optical elements with deformable arrays of thin silicon photodetectors into integrated sheets that can be elastically transformed from the planar geometries in which they are fabricated to hemispherical shapes for integration into apposition cameras. https://www.colorado.edu/lab/xiao/bio-inspired-bug-eye-camera-artificial-compound-eye
  • Article: How Bees See, And Why It Matters
    Scientists consider bees to be a keystone species. They are so important to an ecosystem that it will collapse without them. At least 90 commercially grown crops depend upon bee pollination for survival. How important is the pollination by bees? Ask an almond grower. Without bees, there would be no almonds. Apples, blueberries, cherries, avocados, cucumbers, onions, grapefruit, oranges and pumpkins would also disappear. Bees are the undisputed champions of the pollination world. And their secret weapon? Sight.
  • Article: Monitoring Solitary Bees Using Open Technology
    “Bees in the Backyard” is a citizen science technology project to investigate the nesting behavior of Mason bees, by Mike Teachman, amateur bee enthusiast and Paul Perrault senior field applications engineer.
  • Article: The Biomimicry Manual: What can the honeybee teach a designer?
    What exactly is biomimicry? I think of it as a way of unlocking a whole world of super-powers for humanity. It is literally the next stage of human evolution. Leonardo DaVinci himself said, “Those who are inspired by a model other than Nature, a mistress above all masters, are laboring in vain.” Maybe we’ve been studying the wrong master, trying to make a living on this planet in ways that will ultimately deplete us all. That’s certainly the case with humans and honeybees. Yes, humans love honey, and the busy hum of bees in the garden is a sound that gives us peace on a warm day. But we have much more to learn from them. Find out the lessons they have to teach in this entry of The Biomimicry Manual! https://inhabitat.com/the-biomimicry-manual-what-can-the-honeybee-teach-designers-about-insulation-elasticity-and-flight/
  • Edible NM Magazine article: Creative Pollination
    Los Foodies is a community. Los Foodies is you, Los Foodies is us. Los Foodies is new Mexico cuisine. We are a group of Foodies who are constantly in search of the best that the new Mexico Food and Beverage industry has to offer.
  • Lesson: Polarization
    You may not be aware of it, but polarized light is all around you. Generally speaking, the human visual system is not particularly adept at perceiving polarized light. While some animals, bees in particular, are quite sensitive to polarized light, humans usually find it difficult to detect it with the unaided eye.  Find out more from this lesson on Polarization from Arbor Scientific.
  • Video Collections: Bees
    This Ask Nature resource features a collection of morphological traits of bees, completed as part of a study about bio-inspired design at the University of Calgary. https://asknature.org/collections/bees/
  • Video: Electric Buzzaloo: How Bees See the Invisible
    Bees are amazing social insects, and their relationship with flowers is one of nature's coolest examples of "mutualism". It got me wondering: How do bees see the world? Enjoy this look at how bees see in ultraviolet and even sense electric fields!
  • Video: Honey Bees Make Honey ... and Bread? | Deep Look
    Honey bees make honey from nectar to fuel their flight – and our sweet tooth. But they also need pollen for protein. So they trap, brush and pack it into baskets on their legs to make a special food called bee bread. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sAKkjD3nEv0&list=PLdKlciEDdCQA1MVDuyxZPVloYV3wpunMO&index=28&t=0s
  • Video: How Bees See
    Dr Adrian Dyer invented this mechano-optical device, which emulates the 7,000 individual lenses of a bee's compound eye. Find out more in this video.
  • Video: Native bee discoveries abound in Taos
    Bee Scientist Olivia Messinger Carril is creating the first major survey of native bees in Northern New Mexico. Based in Santa Fe, Carril frequents the high-desert environments in Taos to collect and identify native bees.
  • Video: PHYSICS GIRL EXPERIMENT- Only some humans can see this type of light
    Join Physics girl on a tour of polarized light and learn how to do a simple project to see the invisible.
  • Video: This Vibrating Bumblebee Unlocks a Flower's Hidden Treasure
    Most flowering plants are more than willing to spread their pollen around. But some flowers hold out for just the right partner. Bumblebees and other buzz pollinators know just how to handle these stubborn flowers. They vibrate the blooms, shaking them until they give up the nutritious pollen. Find out more about the science of buzz pollination in this Deep Look video by PBS. https://www.pbs.org/video/deep-look-bumblebee/
  • Video: Watch This Bee Build Her Bee-jeweled Nest | Deep Look
    Pollinator. Mason. Jeweler. A female blue orchard bee is a multitasking master. She fashions exquisite nests out of mud and pollen that resemble pieces of jewelry. And in the process, she helps us grow nuts and fruits. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oPbH1YhsdP8&list=PLdKlciEDdCQA1MVDuyxZPVloYV3wpunMO&index=24&t=0s
  • Video: What happens to bees during a solar eclipse?
    What happens to bees during a solar eclipse? Citizen scientists found out. See what they observed in this Australian Academy of Science video.
  • Video: Why Nature Loves Hexagons
    From spirals to spots to fractals, nature is full of interesting patterns. Many of these patterns even resemble geometric shapes. One of the most common? Hexagons. Why do we see this six-sided shape occur so many times in nature? This week we explore why hexagons are so common in the natural world, from honeycomb to bubbles to rocks, and what their mathematics, physics, and biology may have in common.
  • Video: Without Bees, the Foods We Love Will Be Lost
    Bees, which pollinate crops like apples, blueberries, pumpkins, and watermelon, are facing huge challenges to their survival, such as the overuse of neonic pesticides. https://www.nrdc.org/stories/without-bees-foods-we-love-will-be-lost
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