biomachine

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  • Article: How IoT And AI Can Enable Environmental Sustainability
    Leveraging AI and IoT for environmental sustainability can help maximize our current efforts for environmental protection. According to a 2018 report by Intel, 74% of 200 business decision-makers in environmental sustainability agreed that AI would help solve environmental problems. https://www.forbes.com/sites/cognitiveworld/2019/09/04/how-iot-and-ai-can-enable-environmental-sustainability/#6fd63f6468df
  • Article: Rise Of The Robot Bees: Tiny Drones Turned Into Artificial Pollinators
    Pollinators of important crops are threatened with the challenges in the environment. Can robot drones help? Find out in this article about scientists developing prototype drones for artificial pollination.
  • Thijs Biersteker : Symbiosia
    Trees produce annual growth rings within their trunks, hidden beneath their bark. The thickness and shape of the rings can vary, depending the health of the trees. Environmental changes such as fires, droughts, and pollution levels, as well as disease, all affect their appearance. The rings are visual documentation of the lives of trees. An art installation in the Fondation Cartier’s garden displays real-time data from two trees. Digital screens display a representation of their growth rings, as they change due to environmental conditions. The project is a collaboration between the artist Thijs Biersteker and the scientist/botanist Stefano Mancuso and his International Laboratory of Plant Neurobiology. Find out more about this data art installation in this article with video from The Urban Letter. https://theurbanletter.com/symbiosia/
  • Video: Soft Robot based on Honeycomb Pneumatic Networks
    The SoftRobot group of Multi-agent System Lab, is focused on making better soft manipulators. Imitating the plants, our team make a pneumatic soft manipulator with structure of Honeycomb PneuNet(HPN). By modifying the movement of nature flexible organisms and using a model-free machine learning method, we aim to develop a suitable control method for the robot, which can suit the different environments and grasp various objects. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uoKHcbz-ieM
  • Article and Video: Robotic ray is part animal, part machine
    Kevin Kit Parker wants to build a human heart. His young daughter loves the New England Aquarium in Boston. In this Science report, father’s and daughter’s obsessions have combined in an unlikely creation: a nickel-sized artificial stingray whose swimming is guided by light and powered by rat heart muscle cells. https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/07/robotic-stingray-powered-light-activated-muscle-cells?utm_source=general_public&utm_medium=youtube&utm_campaign=vid-ray-bot-5572
  • Article: Cornell Scientists Create Lifelike Biomachines That Eat, Grow And Race Competitively
    It's not quite Skynet, but scientists have created "lifelike" machines seem like something straight out of a sci-fi movie. Researchers from Cornell University has crafted what they call artificial machines using synthetic DNA that can move on their own, grow, evolve, consume resources and eventually die. https://hothardware.com/news/cornell-scientists-create-lifelike-biomachines-evolve
  • Article: Bio-inspired Bug Eye Camera | Artificial Compound Eye
    In this study, University of Colorado researchers combined elastomeric compound optical elements with deformable arrays of thin silicon photodetectors into integrated sheets that can be elastically transformed from the planar geometries in which they are fabricated to hemispherical shapes for integration into apposition cameras. https://www.colorado.edu/lab/xiao/bio-inspired-bug-eye-camera-artificial-compound-eye
  • Article: How Synthetic Biology Can Help the Environment
    Most environmental science is focused on how to turn back the clock, not push it forward, says Ben Bostick, a geochemist at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. “We think about how we can roll back our footprint, and not so much about how can we make our footprint bigger in a positive way,” he said. “But there are many examples of synthetic biology that I think actually have a lot of potential in the environment. Think of how we can help our environment just by doing things like improving the materials we make using synthetic biology.” https://blogs.ei.columbia.edu/2019/08/14/synthetic-biology-help-environment/
  • Article: How to build a bio-bot: Researchers share design and development of biological machines
    Creating tiny muscle-powered robots that can walk or swim by themselves—or better yet, when prompted—is more complicated than it looks. Rashid Bashir, the head of the bioengineering department at the University of Illinois, and Taher Saif, a professor of mechanical science and engineering at Illinois, will speak in Boston on the design and development of walking and swimming bio-bots at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. https://phys.org/news/2017-02-bio-bot-biological-machines.html
  • Article: Meet “Chirocopter”: A drone that flies within swarms of bats
    Wildlife biologists have put drones to work counting whales, checking bird nests, and nabbing poachers. Now, they’ve designed a drone that can hover within fast-flowing swarms of bats as they zip across a darkened nighttime sky. The drone—or “Chirocopter” (named after Chiroptera, the scientific name for bats)—is equipped with a microphone to record echolocation chirps (sounds that bats use to navigate) and a thermal camera that can “see” bats by detecting their body heat. https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/03/meet-chirocopter-drone-flies-within-swarms-bats
  • Article: Not bot, not beast: scientists create first ever living, programmable organism
    A remarkable combination of artificial intelligence (AI) and biology has produced the world’s first “living robots”. This week, a research team of roboticists and scientists published their recipe for making a new lifeform called xenobots from stem cells. The term “xeno” comes from the frog cells (Xenopus laevis) used to make them. https://theconversation.com/not-bot-not-beast-scientists-create-first-ever-living-programmable-organism-129980
  • Gershon Dublin: PHOX Ears
    The Electronic Fox Ears helmet is a listening device that changes its wearer's experience of hearing. A pair of head-mounted, independently articulated parabolic microphones and built-in bone conduction transducers allow the wearer to sharply direct their attention to faraway sound sources. Field recording and ambient sound have long been a part of electronic music; our device extends these practices by drawing on a tradition of wearable technologies and prosthetic art that blur the boundaries of human perception.
  • Gilberto Esparza: Nomadic Plants
    Vegetation and microorganisms live in symbiosis inside the body of the Nomadic Plants robot. Whenever its bacteria require nourishment, the self-sufficient robot will move towards a contaminated river and ‘drink’ water from it. Through a process of microbial fuel cell, the elements contained in the water are decomposed and turned into energy that can feed the brain circuits of the robot. Find out more about this art work by Gilberto Esparza in this article. https://we-make-money-not-art.com/_1_cuando_lei_acerca/
  • Ivan Henriques: Bio-machine/Jurema Action Plant
    Electromagnetic variations trigger movement of the robotic structure, on which the plant is situated, by means of a custom-made circuit board. The thresholds for response are set in such a way that only touching the plant makes it move away from the person touching it. https://www.mediamatic.net/en/page/52844/bio-machine
  • Natalie Jeremijenko: The Art of the Eco Mindshift
    Natalie Jeremijenko's unusual lab puts art to work, and addresses environmental woes by combining engineering know-how with public art and a team of volunteers. These real-life experiments include: Walking tadpoles, texting "fish," planting fire-hydrant gardens and more. https://www.ted.com/talks/natalie_jeremijenko_the_art_of_the_eco_mindshift?language=en
  • Student example: Bio-inspired drawing samples
    To get you ready for the project of doing a nature-inspired drawing informed by the topic of pollinator decline and biodiversity loss. here are some examples
  • Video: From Butterflies to Biophotonic Implants
    At Caltech, engineers inspired by nano-scale structures on butterfly wings have developed synthetic versions that make eye implants for glaucoma patients function more accurately. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MBXZF9em4Go&feature=share
  • Video: Biobots- Snakebot, Batbot, and More Robots Inspired by Nature | WIRED
    Nature knows what it’s doing, and roboticists are more than happy to steal evolution’s ideas to make a plethora of curious and clever machines. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XDeR1JYXSy0
  • Video: Biomimicry Global Design Challenge 2015 - Jube
    Edible insects may be one of the answers to our global food crisis. They are high in protein and rich in essential micronutrients, such as iron and zinc. They also don’t need as much space as livestock, emit lower levels of greenhouse gases, and have an extremely high feed conversion rate. The BioX team from Thailand developed Jube, a bio-inspired chamber for capturing edible insects, the food of the future. After studying a range of carnivorous plants, the team decided to base their design on the Genlisea violacea “lobster-pot trap.” This is a Y-shaped modified leaf chamber that is easy to enter, but not to exit due to its inward-pointing hair, which force the prey to move in a particular direction. To use Jube, the user puts insect food into the bottom part of the device to lure the insects. Once the insects follow the odor and step into Jube, they can’t turn back. This device promotes a more sustainable way to incorporate protein and nutrients into the world’s diet by offering an insect-capturing device that is unique and beautifully crafted. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oglRLGPVoVA&list=PLRmMq_ZoYztxwYN6KSu2tSHvJ0MdntBzF&index=5
  • Video: DOLPi -Low Cost RasPi Based Polarization Cameras
    Hack-A-Day 2015 Prize Finalist Video for the DOLPi Polarimetric cameras. This video investigates the science of polarization and a new application to solve real world problems such as visualizing land mines, pollution and more.
  • Video: Soft autonomous earthworm robot at MIT
    Earthworms creep along the ground by alternately squeezing and stretching muscles along the length of their bodies, inching forward with each wave of contractions. Snails and sea cucumbers also use this mechanism, called peristalsis, to get around, and our own gastrointestinal tracts operate by a similar action, squeezing muscles along the esophagus to push food to the stomach. Now researchers at MIT, Harvard University and Seoul National University have engineered a soft autonomous robot that moves via peristalsis, crawling across surfaces by contracting segments of its body, much like an earthworm. The robot, made almost entirely of soft materials, is remarkably resilient: Even when stepped upon or bludgeoned with a hammer, the robot is able to inch away, unscathed. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EXkf62qGFII
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