food security

Related Pages

  • Video: Biomimicry Global Design Challenge 2015 - BioNurse
    A team from the Ceres Regional Center for Fruit and Vegetable Innovation in Chile has created a new way to not only help new seedlings grow, but restore degraded soils back to health. The BioNurse returns vitality to the soil by improving conditions for seedlings and exposing them to a mix of nutrients, microbiology and hygroscopic components. It is fabricated with natural fibers and biodegrades after one season. The plants growing from it will be capable of reproducing the same conditions in a natural way and, after two or three seasons, the soil will be productive again. For the BioNurse, the team was inspired by the way that hardy “nurse” plants establish themselves in degraded soils and pave the way for new plant species to grow. With 25% of the world’s soils degraded, this innovation provides a way to grow and protect new plants and ensure that the soil can be regenerated to feed our growing population. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qgjRAZusTaY
  • Video: Biomimicry Global Design Challenge 2015 - HIPS
    This team from South Africa has designed a peer-to-peer networking app called HIPS whose algorithm mimics the way that large collectives in nature, such as a flock of birds or a school of fish, function. The goal is to enable small scale intensive food production systems by providing a dynamically-distributed, peer-to-peer tool to help manage and coordinate their efforts. First, the app will enable food producers to connect with other producers (permaculture, organic, biodynamic – urban or rural) to create a local swarm in which resources can be shared and local exchanges and transactions are conducted. Next, the app connects local swarms with each other to create a regional swarm and establish a produce hub. Finally, it records surplus produce for sale and, once sold, enables coordination with other swarms and members to facilitate distribution logistics. This software facilitates and optimises logistics, provides a medium for fair exchange of value, and provides incentives to food producers to employ best practices in a resilient, distributed value network comprised of collectives of autonomous food producers. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GXuzytvdvrM&list=PLRmMq_ZoYztxwYN6KSu2tSHvJ0MdntBzF&index=4
  • Video: Eating Wild at Rio Fernando Park
    Cebastien and Robin from DryLandsWild show the YCC how to eat a wild lunch at Rio Fernando Park. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=my0pEH3tqAo&feature=share
  • Article and Video: The Importance of Food Sovereignty
    and food production are fundamentally important to Native communities’ health, well-being, economic resilience, cultural heritage and self-preservation. Restoring food sovereignty to Native communities requires the re-introduction of indigenous food production, distribution practices and infrastructure. Food sovereignty initiatives empower tribal members living on the reservations to grow their own healthy, fresh produce, ease low food insecurity and prevent heart disease and type II diabetes. Farm Together Now recently teamed up with the National Family Farm Coalition to make a video about Via Campesina's seven principles of food sovereignty. The video features members of the NFFC from across the country. https://www.diverseelders.org/2019/05/14/the-importance-of-food-sovereignty/
  • Article: Gardening Advice from Indigenous Food Growers
    Many Americans are now experiencing an erratic food supply for the first time. Among COVID-19’s disruptions are bare supermarket shelves and items available yesterday but nowhere to be found today. As you seek ways to replace them, you can look to Native gardens for ideas and inspiration. https://www.resilience.org/stories/2020-06-03/gardening-advice-from-indigenous-food-growers/
  • Article: How Bees See, And Why It Matters
    Scientists consider bees to be a keystone species. They are so important to an ecosystem that it will collapse without them. At least 90 commercially grown crops depend upon bee pollination for survival. How important is the pollination by bees? Ask an almond grower. Without bees, there would be no almonds. Apples, blueberries, cherries, avocados, cucumbers, onions, grapefruit, oranges and pumpkins would also disappear. Bees are the undisputed champions of the pollination world. And their secret weapon? Sight.
  • Article: Potential Risk to Pollinators from Nanotechnology-Based Pesticides
    The decline in populations of insect pollinators is a global concern. While multiple factors are implicated, there is uncertainty surrounding the contribution of certain groups of pesticides to losses in wild and managed bees. Nanotechnology-based pesticides (NBPs) are formulations based on multiple particle sizes and types. Find out more in this research article. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6943562/
  • Article: The Solution to Food Insecurity is Food Sovereignty
     The COVID-19 pandemic is pushing many to recognize the importance and urgency of food sovereignty - the right of people to determine their own food and agricultural systems and their right to produce and consume healthy and culturally appropriate food. https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/solution-food-insecurity-food-sovereignty-200425143803134.html
  • Article: What Is Food Sovereignty?
    One in nine people worldwide are undernourished today. Farmers, fishers, farm workers, and others along the food chain are especially at risk for going hungry. At the same time, world agricultural systems are more productive than they’ve ever been, producing more than enough food to feed everyone. The problem isn’t lack of food, but who has the power and resources to access and control food. Food sovereignty holds that all people, from food producers and harvesters to consumers, have the right to reclaim their power in the food system, by rebuilding relationships between people and the land, and between those who produce food and those who eat it. https://nffc.net/what-we-do/food-sovereignty/
  • Edible NM Magazine article: Creative Pollination
    Los Foodies is a community. Los Foodies is you, Los Foodies is us. Los Foodies is new Mexico cuisine. We are a group of Foodies who are constantly in search of the best that the new Mexico Food and Beverage industry has to offer.
  • Video Resource: From Garden Warriors to Good Seeds: Indigenizing the Local Food Movement
     Check out video interviews spanning across the indigenous food movement in this resource  from professor Elizabeth Hoover and documentary filmmaker Angelo Baca. The video library includes regional and local examples in New Mexico. https://gardenwarriorsgoodseeds.com/video-clips/
  • Video: Biocultural Crops and Traditional Farming
     New Mexico has a multi-cultural legacy of traditional food and agriculture. Native American and Hispano community leaders, academics, farmers, activists and government officials speak to this legacy and how it informs the dream of a healthy statewide food system. https://vimeo.com/10411432
  • Video: Biomimicry Global Design Challenge 2015 - Jube
    Edible insects may be one of the answers to our global food crisis. They are high in protein and rich in essential micronutrients, such as iron and zinc. They also don’t need as much space as livestock, emit lower levels of greenhouse gases, and have an extremely high feed conversion rate. The BioX team from Thailand developed Jube, a bio-inspired chamber for capturing edible insects, the food of the future. After studying a range of carnivorous plants, the team decided to base their design on the Genlisea violacea “lobster-pot trap.” This is a Y-shaped modified leaf chamber that is easy to enter, but not to exit due to its inward-pointing hair, which force the prey to move in a particular direction. To use Jube, the user puts insect food into the bottom part of the device to lure the insects. Once the insects follow the odor and step into Jube, they can’t turn back. This device promotes a more sustainable way to incorporate protein and nutrients into the world’s diet by offering an insect-capturing device that is unique and beautifully crafted. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oglRLGPVoVA&list=PLRmMq_ZoYztxwYN6KSu2tSHvJ0MdntBzF&index=5
  • Video: Food Security: What is the difference
    The politics and culture of food are often expressed in terms of food security and food sovereignty. These terms are often used interchangeably, even though they mean different things. Erika Allen of Chicago’s Grower Power explains that food security considers whether a person knows where their next meal is coming from, while food sovereignty defends a community’s right to decide how they are fed. https://www.pbs.org/video/lexicon-sustainability-food-security/
  • Video: Pollinators Under Pressure
    Tree Media released a new film, Pollinators Under Pressure, about the plight of pollinators around the world and the actions we can all take to ensure their survival, and that of humans and ecosystems everywhere. Narrated by Academy Award®-winning actor and environmental activist Leonardo DiCaprio, the short film features expert voices and diverse points of view from representatives of federal agencies, non-governmental organizations, and youth who are working in communities to help residents understand the impact of everyday actions on pollinators and their habitats.
  • Video: Voices and Visions of Indigenous Terra Madre
    Indigenous Terra Madre is the gathering of indigenous communities and supporters that form part of the Slow Food movement. In November of 2015, representatives of 148 tribes from 58 countries gathered in Shillong, Khasiland, Meghalaya, India, to share information, strategies and resources around indigenous food and biocultural diversity. This video shares some of their voices and visions. https://vimeo.com/channels/culturalconservancy/194108606
  • Video: Without Bees, the Foods We Love Will Be Lost
    Bees, which pollinate crops like apples, blueberries, pumpkins, and watermelon, are facing huge challenges to their survival, such as the overuse of neonic pesticides. https://www.nrdc.org/stories/without-bees-foods-we-love-will-be-lost
  • Video:Food sovereignty|Valerie Segrest at TEDxRainier
     The Indian tribes around the Puget Sound have practiced sustainable balance with its foods for thousands of years, but now the prairie lands and mountain berry meadows are disappearing and salmons runs are dwindling. Valerie Segrest, a member of Muckleshoot tribe and native foods educator tells us to listen to the salmon and cedar tree, who teach us a life of love, generosity and abundance, and to remember when we take better care of our land, we are taking better care of ourselves. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RGkWI7c74oo
Most Popular | Recent Changes | Wiki Home