nature inspired design

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  • Video: Soft Robot based on Honeycomb Pneumatic Networks
    The SoftRobot group of Multi-agent System Lab, is focused on making better soft manipulators. Imitating the plants, our team make a pneumatic soft manipulator with structure of Honeycomb PneuNet(HPN). By modifying the movement of nature flexible organisms and using a model-free machine learning method, we aim to develop a suitable control method for the robot, which can suit the different environments and grasp various objects. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uoKHcbz-ieM
  • Video: What is Biomimicry?
    Biomimicry Is Innovation Inspired By Nature. Learn more in this video by Fast Company that speaks to Janine Benyus founder of the Biomimicry Institute. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FBUpnG1G4yQ
  • Article and Video: Robotic ray is part animal, part machine
    Kevin Kit Parker wants to build a human heart. His young daughter loves the New England Aquarium in Boston. In this Science report, father’s and daughter’s obsessions have combined in an unlikely creation: a nickel-sized artificial stingray whose swimming is guided by light and powered by rat heart muscle cells. https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/07/robotic-stingray-powered-light-activated-muscle-cells?utm_source=general_public&utm_medium=youtube&utm_campaign=vid-ray-bot-5572
  • Article: Bio-inspired Bug Eye Camera | Artificial Compound Eye
    In this study, University of Colorado researchers combined elastomeric compound optical elements with deformable arrays of thin silicon photodetectors into integrated sheets that can be elastically transformed from the planar geometries in which they are fabricated to hemispherical shapes for integration into apposition cameras. https://www.colorado.edu/lab/xiao/bio-inspired-bug-eye-camera-artificial-compound-eye
  • Article: Butterfly wings inspire a better way to absorb light in solar panels
    The wings of a butterfly have inspired a new type of solar cell that can harvest light twice as efficiently as before and could one day improve our solar panels.
  • Article: Butterfly Wings May Improve Airplane Wings
    With a flap of its wings, the butterfly is causing a flurry in the science world.  Through a science called biomimicry, researchers are learning how butterfly wings could improve the design and manufacture of several commercial products.Mechanical engineers are mimicking nature to shorten your next flight. https://www.insidescience.org/video/butterfly-wings-may-improve-airplane-wings
  • Article: The Biomimicry Manual: What Can Paper Wasps Teach Us About 3D Printing?
    3D printing is the coolest thing since sliced bread, but what should we print with? This could go horribly wrong if we don’t take the opportunity to stop and ask how the rest of nature would do it. Maybe our society friends the paper wasps have an opinion: let’s check in with them in this entry of The Biomimicry Manual. https://inhabitat.com/the-biomimicry-manual-what-can-paper-wasps-teach-us-about-3d-printing/
  • Ask Nature: Biomimicry Lesson Resource
    Check out this Biomimicry resource by Ask Nature, a digital platform that connects innovators with the knowledge, ideas, and people that will enable them to imagine and develop circular and resilient solutions to society’s greatest challenges.
  • BIOSTEAM FEATURED ARTIST: Ana MacArthur
    "As a cross-disciplinary light and environmental artist, Ana MacArthur is interested in functioning as a creative catalyst, by excavating nature’s processes and connected metaphors through the specific lenses of life’s relationship to light, environmental intelligence, and appropriate technology."
  • Ivan Henriques: Bio-machine/Jurema Action Plant
    Electromagnetic variations trigger movement of the robotic structure, on which the plant is situated, by means of a custom-made circuit board. The thresholds for response are set in such a way that only touching the plant makes it move away from the person touching it. https://www.mediamatic.net/en/page/52844/bio-machine
  • Resource: Biomimicry design: Great examples
    How can woodpeckers help us to improve sports helmets?
  • Resource: Biomimicry Global Design Challenge
    The science is clear and so is our imperative. To reverse course, we need a new generation of innovators who know how to create human materials, products, and systems that are regenerative, circular, and generous to all species. Are you ready to learn how to design generously through the Biomimicry Global Design Challenge? Our challenge is this: Create a nature-inspired innovation (a product, service, or system) that aligns with one or more Sustainable Development Goals, outlined by the United Nations. https://challenge.biomimicry.org/en/challenge/global-design-challenge-2020
  • Student Example: Nature inspired industrial design sneaker by student
    Example of nature inspired industrial design sneaker by RISD student
  • Video Collections: Bees
    This Ask Nature resource features a collection of morphological traits of bees, completed as part of a study about bio-inspired design at the University of Calgary. https://asknature.org/collections/bees/
  • Video: Biobots- Snakebot, Batbot, and More Robots Inspired by Nature | WIRED
    Nature knows what it’s doing, and roboticists are more than happy to steal evolution’s ideas to make a plethora of curious and clever machines. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XDeR1JYXSy0
  • Video: Biomimicry Global Design Challenge 2015 - Jube
    Edible insects may be one of the answers to our global food crisis. They are high in protein and rich in essential micronutrients, such as iron and zinc. They also don’t need as much space as livestock, emit lower levels of greenhouse gases, and have an extremely high feed conversion rate. The BioX team from Thailand developed Jube, a bio-inspired chamber for capturing edible insects, the food of the future. After studying a range of carnivorous plants, the team decided to base their design on the Genlisea violacea “lobster-pot trap.” This is a Y-shaped modified leaf chamber that is easy to enter, but not to exit due to its inward-pointing hair, which force the prey to move in a particular direction. To use Jube, the user puts insect food into the bottom part of the device to lure the insects. Once the insects follow the odor and step into Jube, they can’t turn back. This device promotes a more sustainable way to incorporate protein and nutrients into the world’s diet by offering an insect-capturing device that is unique and beautifully crafted. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oglRLGPVoVA&list=PLRmMq_ZoYztxwYN6KSu2tSHvJ0MdntBzF&index=5
  • Video: Design Inspired by Nature
    What if we told you that the most powerful laboratory in the world doesn’t have any microscopes, safety goggles, or walls? When it comes to figuring out efficient solutions, no human lab can compete with nature. That’s because evolution and natural selection work like an experiment: as nature’s conditions change, designs can either succeed or fail. Nature is such a powerful lab because it can run millions of these evolutionary experiments simultaneously. And, just like labs, nature has a lot to teach us! Watch this video to learn how engineers draw inspiration from the natural strength of a glass sea sponge! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ezd4AcC3uZ4&feature=share
  • Video: From mach-20 glider to hummingbird drone| TED
    "What would you attempt to do if you knew you could not fail?" asks Regina Dugan, then director of DARPA, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. In this breathtaking talk she describes some of the extraordinary projects -- a robotic hummingbird, a prosthetic arm controlled by thought, and, well, the internet -- that her agency has created by not worrying that they might fail. https://www.ted.com/talks/regina_dugan_from_mach_20_glider_to_hummingbird_drone?language=eo#t-998234
  • Video: Tending the Wild- Gathering Medicine
     Indigenous peoples in California relied on traditional gathering to provide for all of their food and medicinal needs. California's landscapes produce hundreds of indigenous plant species that have been used thousands of years prior to European contact. And many of these plants and their preparations as medicine informed modern pharmacopeia, most notably aspirin, which is derived from the bark of the willow tree. Native herbalism continues to be relevant today. There is a resurgence of traditional medicinal practices in Native communities and a growing interest in this knowledge in popular culture. In this video, we explore how Native herbalism is practiced today and how a holistic approach to health and the environment can inform healthy living. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jbbcok8Lzs0
  • Video: What Gives the Morpho Butterfly Its Magnificent Blue? | Deep Look
    What does it mean to be blue? The wings of a Morpho butterfly are some of the most brilliant structures in nature, and yet they contain no blue pigment -- they harness the physics of light at the nanoscale. Learn more about these butterflies in this Deep Look video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29Ts7CsJDpg&list=PLdKlciEDdCQA1MVDuyxZPVloYV3wpunMO&index=5&t=0s
  • Video:Food sovereignty|Valerie Segrest at TEDxRainier
     The Indian tribes around the Puget Sound have practiced sustainable balance with its foods for thousands of years, but now the prairie lands and mountain berry meadows are disappearing and salmons runs are dwindling. Valerie Segrest, a member of Muckleshoot tribe and native foods educator tells us to listen to the salmon and cedar tree, who teach us a life of love, generosity and abundance, and to remember when we take better care of our land, we are taking better care of ourselves. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RGkWI7c74oo
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