quantum biology

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    Dung Beetles use the stars to navigate. New discoveries are finding they navigate by the wind direction and solar orientation as well. Find out more in this National Geographic article.
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  • Article: A bird’s eye view of quantum entanglement
    Scientists have long wondered how birds “read” Earth’s magnetic field to navigate. Some think entangled particles in birds’ eyes play a role. Find out more in this article by NOVA. https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/article/birds-quantum-entanglement/
  • Article: How Bees See, And Why It Matters
    Scientists consider bees to be a keystone species. They are so important to an ecosystem that it will collapse without them. At least 90 commercially grown crops depend upon bee pollination for survival. How important is the pollination by bees? Ask an almond grower. Without bees, there would be no almonds. Apples, blueberries, cherries, avocados, cucumbers, onions, grapefruit, oranges and pumpkins would also disappear. Bees are the undisputed champions of the pollination world. And their secret weapon? Sight.
  • Article: Rudolph and relatives have UV vision
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  • Ask Nature: Biomimicry Lesson Resource
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  • Bats Use Polarized Light To Set Internal Compasses
    Although bats are known for using echolocation to orient and navigate, they draw on a suite of senses to get around. A new study reveals another ability: Bats use patterns of polarized light in the sky to navigate.
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    Bats are known for their bony wings and fast flight. Researchers at Brown University in Rhode Island are studying these characteristics to determine how bats can advance human technology.
  • Video: Echolocation
    Are bats really blind? Not exactly. Besides their eyes, bats use a special process called echolocation to navigate their environment. Watch this video to find out how bats "see" the world around them as they look for prey in the dark.
  • Video: Electric Buzzaloo: How Bees See the Invisible
    Bees are amazing social insects, and their relationship with flowers is one of nature's coolest examples of "mutualism". It got me wondering: How do bees see the world? Enjoy this look at how bees see in ultraviolet and even sense electric fields!
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    We found that wild flying hummingbirds have electrostatic charges of up to ~800 pC. Such electrical charges are high enough to produce attraction of floral stamens and floating pollen-size particles.
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  • Video: How Quantum Biology Might Explain Life’s Biggest Questions | Jim Al-Khalili | TED Talks
    How does a robin know to fly south? The answer might be weirder than you think: Quantum physics may be involved. Jim Al-Khalili rounds up the extremely new, extremely strange world of quantum biology, where something Einstein once called “spooky action at a distance” helps birds navigate, and quantum effects might explain the origin of life itself. Find out more about quantum biology in this TED talk by Jim Al-Khalili. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_qgSz1UmcBM&feature=share
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  • Video: This Vibrating Bumblebee Unlocks a Flower's Hidden Treasure
    Most flowering plants are more than willing to spread their pollen around. But some flowers hold out for just the right partner. Bumblebees and other buzz pollinators know just how to handle these stubborn flowers. They vibrate the blooms, shaking them until they give up the nutritious pollen. Find out more about the science of buzz pollination in this Deep Look video by PBS. https://www.pbs.org/video/deep-look-bumblebee/
  • Video: What Is Echolocation? | Earth Unplugged
    Echolocation allows animals to build up an understanding of their surroundings but how does it work? Find out the science of echolocation in the BBC Unplugged video.
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