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  • Article: How IoT And AI Can Enable Environmental Sustainability
    Leveraging AI and IoT for environmental sustainability can help maximize our current efforts for environmental protection. According to a 2018 report by Intel, 74% of 200 business decision-makers in environmental sustainability agreed that AI would help solve environmental problems. https://www.forbes.com/sites/cognitiveworld/2019/09/04/how-iot-and-ai-can-enable-environmental-sustainability/#6fd63f6468df
  • Biomimicry Toolbox
    By applying nature’s design lessons, we can create solutions that help support a healthy planet. This digital resource site from the Biomimicry Institute provides a quick-start guide to biomimicry, introducing the core concepts and methods that are essential to successfully incorporate insights from nature into design. https://toolbox.biomimicry.org/
  • Video: Soft Robot based on Honeycomb Pneumatic Networks
    The SoftRobot group of Multi-agent System Lab, is focused on making better soft manipulators. Imitating the plants, our team make a pneumatic soft manipulator with structure of Honeycomb PneuNet(HPN). By modifying the movement of nature flexible organisms and using a model-free machine learning method, we aim to develop a suitable control method for the robot, which can suit the different environments and grasp various objects. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uoKHcbz-ieM
  • Article and Video: Robotic ray is part animal, part machine
    Kevin Kit Parker wants to build a human heart. His young daughter loves the New England Aquarium in Boston. In this Science report, father’s and daughter’s obsessions have combined in an unlikely creation: a nickel-sized artificial stingray whose swimming is guided by light and powered by rat heart muscle cells. https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/07/robotic-stingray-powered-light-activated-muscle-cells?utm_source=general_public&utm_medium=youtube&utm_campaign=vid-ray-bot-5572
  • Article: A bird’s eye view of quantum entanglement
    Scientists have long wondered how birds “read” Earth’s magnetic field to navigate. Some think entangled particles in birds’ eyes play a role. Find out more in this article by NOVA. https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/article/birds-quantum-entanglement/
  • Article: Bio-inspired Bug Eye Camera | Artificial Compound Eye
    In this study, University of Colorado researchers combined elastomeric compound optical elements with deformable arrays of thin silicon photodetectors into integrated sheets that can be elastically transformed from the planar geometries in which they are fabricated to hemispherical shapes for integration into apposition cameras. https://www.colorado.edu/lab/xiao/bio-inspired-bug-eye-camera-artificial-compound-eye
  • Article: How Bees See, And Why It Matters
    Scientists consider bees to be a keystone species. They are so important to an ecosystem that it will collapse without them. At least 90 commercially grown crops depend upon bee pollination for survival. How important is the pollination by bees? Ask an almond grower. Without bees, there would be no almonds. Apples, blueberries, cherries, avocados, cucumbers, onions, grapefruit, oranges and pumpkins would also disappear. Bees are the undisputed champions of the pollination world. And their secret weapon? Sight.
  • Article: How Synthetic Biology Can Help the Environment
    Most environmental science is focused on how to turn back the clock, not push it forward, says Ben Bostick, a geochemist at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. “We think about how we can roll back our footprint, and not so much about how can we make our footprint bigger in a positive way,” he said. “But there are many examples of synthetic biology that I think actually have a lot of potential in the environment. Think of how we can help our environment just by doing things like improving the materials we make using synthetic biology.” https://blogs.ei.columbia.edu/2019/08/14/synthetic-biology-help-environment/
  • Article: How to build a bio-bot: Researchers share design and development of biological machines
    Creating tiny muscle-powered robots that can walk or swim by themselves—or better yet, when prompted—is more complicated than it looks. Rashid Bashir, the head of the bioengineering department at the University of Illinois, and Taher Saif, a professor of mechanical science and engineering at Illinois, will speak in Boston on the design and development of walking and swimming bio-bots at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. https://phys.org/news/2017-02-bio-bot-biological-machines.html
  • Article: Listening to Nature: The Emerging Field of Bioacoustics
    Researchers are increasingly placing microphones in forests and other ecosystems to monitor birds, insects, frogs, and other animals. As the technology advances and becomes less costly, proponents argue, bioacoustics is poised to become an important remote-sensing tool for conservation. https://e360.yale.edu/features/listening-to-nature-the-emerging-field-of-bioacoustics
  • Article: Not bot, not beast: scientists create first ever living, programmable organism
    A remarkable combination of artificial intelligence (AI) and biology has produced the world’s first “living robots”. This week, a research team of roboticists and scientists published their recipe for making a new lifeform called xenobots from stem cells. The term “xeno” comes from the frog cells (Xenopus laevis) used to make them. https://theconversation.com/not-bot-not-beast-scientists-create-first-ever-living-programmable-organism-129980
  • Article: Potential Risk to Pollinators from Nanotechnology-Based Pesticides
    The decline in populations of insect pollinators is a global concern. While multiple factors are implicated, there is uncertainty surrounding the contribution of certain groups of pesticides to losses in wild and managed bees. Nanotechnology-based pesticides (NBPs) are formulations based on multiple particle sizes and types. Find out more in this research article. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6943562/
  • Article: When artists get involved in research, science benefits
    When artists and scientists get together, creative sparks can fly. Collaborative sci-art projects are increasingly popular and one obvious benefit is the greater visibility of the research through the artist’s work. This project explores scientific and artistic aspects of Antarctic ice crystals. https://theconversation.com/when-artists-get-involved-in-research-science-benefits-82147
  • Natalie Jeremijenko: The Art of the Eco Mindshift
    Natalie Jeremijenko's unusual lab puts art to work, and addresses environmental woes by combining engineering know-how with public art and a team of volunteers. These real-life experiments include: Walking tadpoles, texting "fish," planting fire-hydrant gardens and more. https://www.ted.com/talks/natalie_jeremijenko_the_art_of_the_eco_mindshift?language=en
  • Online Radio: Bat-lovers unite! Monitoring, protecting and loving our flying mammal friends
    The Taos Land Trust has been monitoring the bat population at Rio Fernando Park in Taos, New Mexico for over a year. How do we do it? Bat expert Mike Balistreri explains the scientific process of monitoring bats, the status of bat populations in northern New Mexico and dives into the importance of bats for our ecosystems. Find out more about the 20 species of bats found at Rio Fernando Park in the Taos Land Trust's radio show. https://soundcloud.com/taos-land-trust/bats?fbclid=IwAR2LNsKc_Kin9c1pSm296l4_1uikxfytsJid6cxdMesvo2qYtGt1uhJ-LEQ
  • Resource: Biomimicry Global Design Challenge
    The science is clear and so is our imperative. To reverse course, we need a new generation of innovators who know how to create human materials, products, and systems that are regenerative, circular, and generous to all species. Are you ready to learn how to design generously through the Biomimicry Global Design Challenge? Our challenge is this: Create a nature-inspired innovation (a product, service, or system) that aligns with one or more Sustainable Development Goals, outlined by the United Nations. https://challenge.biomimicry.org/en/challenge/global-design-challenge-2020
  • Video: Art vs. science? The battle that never was
    What role can art play in science? An unexpectedly important one, says NASA's Michelle Thaller. Art is being used by NASA to communicate its discoveries and concepts and can help people learn science. Find out more in this video by Big Think. https://bigthink.com/videos/michelle-thaller-art-vs-science-the-battle-that-never-was
  • Video: Bats advancing human technology
    Bats are known for their bony wings and fast flight. Researchers at Brown University in Rhode Island are studying these characteristics to determine how bats can advance human technology.
  • Video: Bioacoustic Monitoring: A Community Approach to Protecting the Rainforest
    Join National Geographic Explorer Topher White as he uses recycled cellphones to combat deforestation around the world with his company, Rainforest Connection.
  • Video: Bioacoustics Reveal How Biodiversity Changes Across Borneo’s Logged Forests
    The Nature Conservancy’s Indonesia program is using bioacoustics in Berau, where they will use forest sounds to understand how biodiversity changes with different land use types across East Kalimantan.
  • Video: How Quantum Biology Might Explain Life’s Biggest Questions | Jim Al-Khalili | TED Talks
    How does a robin know to fly south? The answer might be weirder than you think: Quantum physics may be involved. Jim Al-Khalili rounds up the extremely new, extremely strange world of quantum biology, where something Einstein once called “spooky action at a distance” helps birds navigate, and quantum effects might explain the origin of life itself. Find out more about quantum biology in this TED talk by Jim Al-Khalili. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_qgSz1UmcBM&feature=share
  • Video: Introduction to Ecology
    Learn about the biosphere, ecosystems, communities, populations, organisms, habitats, niches, generalists, specialists, biotic and abiotic factors in this video!
  • Video: Professor David Dunn's Bark Beetle Patent (UC Santa Cruz)
    UC Santa Cruz music professor David Dunn has received a patent to help fight bark beetles ravaging Western forests, killing millions of trees throughout the West. Read more on his invention and solution. Find out more about this technology and art collaboration in this UC Santa Cruz video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a0X9rhHH2Zg&feature=share
  • Video: Soft autonomous earthworm robot at MIT
    Earthworms creep along the ground by alternately squeezing and stretching muscles along the length of their bodies, inching forward with each wave of contractions. Snails and sea cucumbers also use this mechanism, called peristalsis, to get around, and our own gastrointestinal tracts operate by a similar action, squeezing muscles along the esophagus to push food to the stomach. Now researchers at MIT, Harvard University and Seoul National University have engineered a soft autonomous robot that moves via peristalsis, crawling across surfaces by contracting segments of its body, much like an earthworm. The robot, made almost entirely of soft materials, is remarkably resilient: Even when stepped upon or bludgeoned with a hammer, the robot is able to inch away, unscathed. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EXkf62qGFII
  • Video:12 sustainable design ideas from nature | Janine Benyus
    In this inspiring TED talk about recent developments in biomimicry, Janine Benyus provides heartening examples of ways in which nature is already influencing the products and systems we build.
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