sound

Related Pages

  • Article: How do bats echolocate and how are they adapted to this activity?
    Bats are a fascinating group of animals. They are one of the few mammals that can use sound to navigate--a trick called echolocation. Of the some 900 species of bats, more than half rely on echolocation to detect obstacles in flight, find their way into roosts and forage for food. Find out in this article by Scientific American. https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-do-bats-echolocate-an/
  • Article: For horseshoe bats, wiggling ears and nose makes biosonar more informative
    Researchers at Virginia Tech are gaining insight into just how important wiggly noses and ears are to bats and their bio sonar systems. Find out more in this short article. https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-04/vt-fhb040417.php
  • Article: Monitoring Solitary Bees Using Open Technology
    “Bees in the Backyard” is a citizen science technology project to investigate the nesting behavior of Mason bees, by Mike Teachman, amateur bee enthusiast and Paul Perrault senior field applications engineer.
  • Experiment: Designer Ears Make “better” ears!
    Why do animals’ ears look different from yours? What would life be like if your ears were shaped differently? Make new ears for yourself and find out. Try out this quick activity to prototype an idea.
  • Gershon Dublin: PHOX Ears
    The Electronic Fox Ears helmet is a listening device that changes its wearer's experience of hearing. A pair of head-mounted, independently articulated parabolic microphones and built-in bone conduction transducers allow the wearer to sharply direct their attention to faraway sound sources. Field recording and ambient sound have long been a part of electronic music; our device extends these practices by drawing on a tradition of wearable technologies and prosthetic art that blur the boundaries of human perception.
  • Tania Rubio: Biomachine Wind Animals
    Video: Check out this sound installation that references bird calls, traditional pottery and technology. Interactive Sound Installation supported by the program Art, Science and Technology of FONCA-UNAM, 2019. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yk2-a7SpxTg
  • Video: 10 Ultrasonic Sensor Projects
    This video is about 10 Ultrasonic Sensor Projects you can make yourself.
  • Video: Bioacoustics Reveal How Biodiversity Changes Across Borneo’s Logged Forests
    The Nature Conservancy’s Indonesia program is using bioacoustics in Berau, where they will use forest sounds to understand how biodiversity changes with different land use types across East Kalimantan.
  • Video: David Dunn- Sonic weapon successful in bark beetle battle
    Forest scientists at Northern Arizona University, desperate to stop the massive devastation from bark beetle infestation, have recruited a powerful and unconventional force to fight this fierce little bug—Santa Fe musician and composer David Dunn. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P2YMw7Lx3Fo&feature=share
  • Video: Hear My Nectar: Dish-Shaped Leaves Attract Pollinating Bats
    Scientist Ralph Simon explains how a dish-shaped leaf attracts bat pollinators.
  • Video: Professor David Dunn's Bark Beetle Patent (UC Santa Cruz)
    UC Santa Cruz music professor David Dunn has received a patent to help fight bark beetles ravaging Western forests, killing millions of trees throughout the West. Read more on his invention and solution. Find out more about this technology and art collaboration in this UC Santa Cruz video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a0X9rhHH2Zg&feature=share
  • Video: Soundscape ecology
    Soundscape ecology is a growing field of research that uses sound to track how ecosystems change over time. Bryan Pijanowski and Matt Harris work with a team of researchers to collect hours of sound at locations from the Alaskan tundra to a rainforest in Borneo. By analyzing the recordings they can reveal changes in each ecosystem that we might not otherwise be able to see.
  • Video: What Is Echolocation? | Earth Unplugged
    Echolocation allows animals to build up an understanding of their surroundings but how does it work? Find out the science of echolocation in the BBC Unplugged video.
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