species in peril

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  • Article: Rise Of The Robot Bees: Tiny Drones Turned Into Artificial Pollinators
    Pollinators of important crops are threatened with the challenges in the environment. Can robot drones help? Find out in this article about scientists developing prototype drones for artificial pollination.
  • Video: Why is biodiversity so important? - Kim Preshoff
    Our planet’s diverse, thriving ecosystems may seem like permanent fixtures, but they’re actually vulnerable to collapse. Jungles can become deserts, and reefs can become lifeless rocks. What makes one ecosystem strong and another weak in the face of change? Kim Preshoff details the answer is biodiversity in this TEDed video.
  • Article: Desert Bees Have a Secret: How to Survive a Decade of Drought
    Bees are most diverse in arid places. Will their strategies hold up in a changing climate — and can we learn enough about them before it’s too late? Find out how desert scientists are researching Southwest bees in this article.
  • Article: Potential Risk to Pollinators from Nanotechnology-Based Pesticides
    The decline in populations of insect pollinators is a global concern. While multiple factors are implicated, there is uncertainty surrounding the contribution of certain groups of pesticides to losses in wild and managed bees. Nanotechnology-based pesticides (NBPs) are formulations based on multiple particle sizes and types. Find out more in this research article. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6943562/
  • Article: Why insect populations are plummeting—and why it matters
    A new study suggests that 40 percent of insect species are in decline, a sobering finding that has jarred researchers worldwide.
  • Video: Bioacoustics Reveal How Biodiversity Changes Across Borneo’s Logged Forests
    The Nature Conservancy’s Indonesia program is using bioacoustics in Berau, where they will use forest sounds to understand how biodiversity changes with different land use types across East Kalimantan.
  • Video: Citizen science - in researching biodiversity
    Citizen science is a relatively new way of knowledge co-creation, where professional scientists and enthusiastic citizens collaboratively search for answers. While it certainly presents challenges, it also provides a great opportunity for both parties to engage science and nature together, and ultimately, can result in transformative societal changes. This video showcases the different levels of participation available, and the advantages of, citizen science by illustrating it with a compelling and intimate visual journey through the seas to the backyard. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O4xdKenrlJ4
  • Video: David Dunn- Sonic weapon successful in bark beetle battle
    Forest scientists at Northern Arizona University, desperate to stop the massive devastation from bark beetle infestation, have recruited a powerful and unconventional force to fight this fierce little bug—Santa Fe musician and composer David Dunn. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P2YMw7Lx3Fo&feature=share
  • Video: Pollinators Under Pressure
    Tree Media released a new film, Pollinators Under Pressure, about the plight of pollinators around the world and the actions we can all take to ensure their survival, and that of humans and ecosystems everywhere. Narrated by Academy Award®-winning actor and environmental activist Leonardo DiCaprio, the short film features expert voices and diverse points of view from representatives of federal agencies, non-governmental organizations, and youth who are working in communities to help residents understand the impact of everyday actions on pollinators and their habitats.
  • Video: Professor David Dunn's Bark Beetle Patent (UC Santa Cruz)
    UC Santa Cruz music professor David Dunn has received a patent to help fight bark beetles ravaging Western forests, killing millions of trees throughout the West. Read more on his invention and solution. Find out more about this technology and art collaboration in this UC Santa Cruz video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a0X9rhHH2Zg&feature=share
  • Video: Without Bees, the Foods We Love Will Be Lost
    Bees, which pollinate crops like apples, blueberries, pumpkins, and watermelon, are facing huge challenges to their survival, such as the overuse of neonic pesticides. https://www.nrdc.org/stories/without-bees-foods-we-love-will-be-lost
  • Video:Food sovereignty|Valerie Segrest at TEDxRainier
     The Indian tribes around the Puget Sound have practiced sustainable balance with its foods for thousands of years, but now the prairie lands and mountain berry meadows are disappearing and salmons runs are dwindling. Valerie Segrest, a member of Muckleshoot tribe and native foods educator tells us to listen to the salmon and cedar tree, who teach us a life of love, generosity and abundance, and to remember when we take better care of our land, we are taking better care of ourselves. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RGkWI7c74oo
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