bees

Related Pages

  • Show Me Some Science! Polarization of the Sky
    Bees are capable of remarkable feats of orientation and navigation; they have a very strong sense of direction.
  • Electric Buzzaloo: How Bees See the Invisible
    Bees are amazing social insects, and their relationship with flowers is one of nature's coolest examples of "mutualism". It got me wondering: How do bees see the world? Enjoy this look at how bees see in ultraviolet and even sense electric fields!
  • How Bees See
    Dr Adrian Dyer is created this mechano-optical device, which emulates the 7,000 individual lenses of a bee's compound eye. Find out more in this video.
  • Monitoring Solitary Bees Using Open Technology
    “Bees in the Backyard” is a citizen science technology project to investigate the nesting behavior of Mason bees, created by Mike Teachman, amateur bee enthusiast and Paul Perrault senior field applications engineer.
  • Native bee discoveries abound in Taos
    Bee Scientist Olivia Messinger Carril is creating the first major survey of native bees in Northern New Mexico. Based in Santa Fe, Carril frequents the high-desert environments in Taos to collect and identify native bees.
  • Only some humans can see this type of light
    Join Physics girl on a tour of polarized light and learn how to do a simple project to see the invisible.
  • Polarization
    You may not be aware of it, but polarized light is all around you. Generally speaking, the human visual system is not particularly adept at perceiving polarized light. While some animals, bees in particular, are quite sensitive to polarized light, humans usually find it difficult to detect it with the unaided eye.  Find out more from this lesson on Polarization from Arbor Scientific.
  • What happens to bees during a solar eclipse?
    What happens to bees during a solar eclipse? Citizen scientists found out. See what they observed in this Australian Academy of Science video.
  • Why Nature Loves Hexagons
    From spirals to spots to fractals, nature is full of interesting patterns. Many of these patterns even resemble geometric shapes. One of the most common? Hexagons. Why do we see this six-sided shape occur so many times in nature? This week we explore why hexagons are so common in the natural world, from honeycomb to bubbles to rocks, and what their mathematics, physics, and biology may have in common.
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