pollinators

Related Pages

  • Dust Blooms. Can we put a price on the services that urban flowers provide?
    Artist and landscape planner Alexandra Toland worked with experts in environmental microbiology, urban soils, and of course urban ecosystem services to explore the ability of flowers to help filter atmospheric particulate matter (PM.) https://we-make-money-not-art.com/dust-bloom-can-we-put-a-price-on-the-services-that-urban-flowers-provide/
  • Ecosystem services
    How is biodiversity essential to humans? We couldn't survive without it! Biodiversity supplies food, shelter, medicine and so much more to humans. Find out more in this California Academy of Sciences video.
  • Not Just the Birds and Bees – 6 Fast Facts About Pollinating Bats
    The birds and the bees may rule the daytime, but as soon as the sun sets, it is the bats that get to work pollinating.  Worldwide, over 500 species of flowers in at least 67 plant families rely on bats as their major or exclusive pollinators. Learn more in this National Wildlife Foundation article.
  • Show Me Some Science! Polarization of the Sky
    Bees are capable of remarkable feats of orientation and navigation; they have a very strong sense of direction.
  • Why is biodiversity so important? - Kim Preshoff
    Our planet’s diverse, thriving ecosystems may seem like permanent fixtures, but they’re actually vulnerable to collapse. Jungles can become deserts, and reefs can become lifeless rocks. What makes one ecosystem strong and another weak in the face of change? Kim Preshoff details the answer is biodiversity in this TEDed video.
  • Bats Use Polarized Light to Navigate; Creatures Not So Blind After All
    Bats use polarized light to navigate the sky, scientists have found.In addition to echolocation — which only works for distances between 16 and 160 feet away — and an internal magnetic compass, researchers say that being able to follow the patterns of polarized light dispersed across the lower atmosphere help give bats a sense of directional orientation.
  • BioSTEAM: Make an Interactive Polarized Light Visualizer!
    [IMG]
  • Desert Bees Have a Secret: How to Survive a Decade of Drought
    Bees are most diverse in arid places. Will their strategies hold up in a changing climate — and can we learn enough about them before it’s too late? Find out how desert scientists are researching Southwest bees in this article.
  • Electric Buzzaloo: How Bees See the Invisible
    Bees are amazing social insects, and their relationship with flowers is one of nature's coolest examples of "mutualism". It got me wondering: How do bees see the world? Enjoy this look at how bees see in ultraviolet and even sense electric fields!
  • Electrostatic charge on hummingbirds and its role in pollination
    We found that wild flying hummingbirds have electrostatic charges of up to ~800 pC. Such electrical charges are high enough to produce attraction of floral stamens and floating pollen-size particles.
  • Native bee discoveries abound in Taos
    Bee Scientist Olivia Messinger Carril is creating the first major survey of native bees in Northern New Mexico. Based in Santa Fe, Carril frequents the high-desert environments in Taos to collect and identify native bees.
  • Only some humans can see this type of light
    Join Physics girl on a tour of polarized light and learn how to do a simple project to see the invisible.
  • Pollinators Under Pressure
    Tree Media released a new film, Pollinators Under Pressure, about the plight of pollinators around the world and the actions we can all take to ensure their survival, and that of humans and ecosystems everywhere. Narrated by Academy Award®-winning actor and environmental activist Leonardo DiCaprio, the short film features expert voices and diverse points of view from representatives of federal agencies, non-governmental organizations, and youth who are working in communities to help residents understand the impact of everyday actions on pollinators and their habitats.
  • Universal Assembly Unit creates pulsing Light Pollination installation for iGuzzini
    Commissioned by iGuzzini, Light Pollination consists of 20,000 LED lights embedded on the ends of fibre-optic cables. These gently pulse with light to mimic the phenomenon of bioluminescence in nature. https://www.dezeen.com/2016/09/12/video-interview-universal-assembly-unit-interactive-installation-light-pollination-iguzzini-movie/
  • What happens to bees during a solar eclipse?
    What happens to bees during a solar eclipse? Citizen scientists found out. See what they observed in this Australian Academy of Science video.
  • Why insect populations are plummeting—and why it matters
    A new study suggests that 40 percent of insect species are in decline, a sobering finding that has jarred researchers worldwide.
Most Popular | Recent Changes | Wiki Home